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Google Chrome Shockwave Flash crashed

Monday, October 16, 2017 - Posted by Keith A. Smith, in VMware

Google put out an update over the a few days ago that patched a few things but they also somehow managed to update their embedded flash to a newer version than even Adobe Flash offers. 


Rebooting your computer and or your vcenter will not solve this issue.

Try navigating to %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\PepperFlash in Windows and you should see a folder called 27.0.0.170 – this is the new Flash distribution.  You should also see a folder called 27.0.0.159 and all you have to do is deleted the 27.0.0.170 folder and be on your way.  Some people have had to copy the contents from 27.0.0.159 into 27.0.0.170 and have had success that way.


Another work around would be to use another browser (e.g. Internet Explorer, etc.) to access vcenter. It’s been a tough month for patching, test when you can and always have contingency plan in case things don’t work as expected.

-End
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How to import the VCSA certificate for VMware vSphere

Monday, September 18, 2017 - Posted by Keith A. Smith, in VMware, Microsoft

How to import the VCSA certificate so VMware vSphere browser security warnings go away in Windows 10

  1. Open the Edge or google chrome Brower, type in the FQDN for your VCSA 6.5 then press enter, when warned, click 'Details'.
  2. Bypass the security warning in order to proceed to the Getting Started page of the VCSA
  3. Click on 'Download trusted root CA certificates' on the right to download the zip file which contains the certs
  4. Navigate to the zip file location, extract the contents of the zip. Open the folder downloads folder then go into certs
  5. The certs vary by what OS you are using so choose the right folder then double-click 'filename.0.crt' (your exact filename will vary)
  6. Click 'Install Certificate' and choose local machine (Note: If you get any prompts click yes to proceed)
  7. On the certificate store screen choose place all certifications in the following store and click browse
  8. Select 'Trusted Root Certification Authorities' then click 'OK'
  9. Click next and then finish then ok.

Now to test it close the browser then visit the  FQDN for your VCSA 6.5 you should see the green pad lock now and shouldn’t see the security warning any longer.


-End
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Applying a “Defense-in-Depth” Strategy

Monday, May 22, 2017 - Posted by Keith A. Smith, in Network, VMware, Microsoft, Linux, Security

IT Teams and Staff can effectively maintain physical and information security with a “defense-in-depth” approach that addresses both internal and external threats. Defense-in-depth is based on the idea that any one point of protection may, and probably will, be defeated. This approach uses three different types of layers (physical, electronic, and procedural) and applies appropriate controls to address different risks that might arise in each.
 
The same concept works for both physical and network security. Multiple layers of network security can protect networked assets, data and end points, just as multiple layers of physical security can protect high-value physical assets. With a defense-in-depth approach:  

System security is purposely designed into the infrastructure from the beginning. Attackers are faced with multiple hurdles to overcome if they want to successfully break through or bypass the entire system. 
A weakness or flaw in one layer can be protected by strength, capabilities or new variable introduced through other security layers. 

Typical defense-in-depth approaches involve six areas: physical, network, computer, application, device and staff education.

1. Physical Security – It seems obvious that physical security would be an important layer in a defense-in-depth strategy, but don’t take it for granted. Guards, gates, locks, port block-outs, and key cards all help keep people away from systems that shouldn’t touch or alter. In addition, the lines between the physical security systems and information systems are blurring as physical access can be tied to information access. 

2. Network Security – An essential part of information fabric is network security and should be equipped with firewalls, intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDS/IPS), and general networking equipment such as switches and routers configured with their security features enabled. Zones establish domains of trust for security access and smaller virtual local area networks (VLANs) to shape and manage network traffic. A demilitarized zone between public resources and the internal or trusted resources allows data and services to be shared securely. 

3. Computer Hardening – Well known (and published) software vulnerabilities are the number one way that intruders gain access to automation systems. Examples of Computer Hardening include the use of: 
Antivirus software
Application whitelisting
Host intrusion-detection systems (HIDS) and other endpoint security solutions
Removal of unused applications, protocols and services
Closing unnecessary ports

Software patching practices can work in concert with these hardening techniques to help further address computer risks that are susceptible to malware cyber risks including viruses and Trojans etc.

Follow these guidelines to help reduce risk:
Disable software automatic updating services on PCs
Inventory target computers for applications, and software versions and revisions
Subscribe to and monitor vendor patch qualification services for patch compatibility
Obtain product patches and software upgrades directly from the vendor
Pre-test all patches on non-operational, non-mission critical systems
Schedule the application of patches and upgrades and plan for contingencies 

4. Application Security  – This refers infusing system applications with good security practices, such as a Role Based Access Control System,Multi-factor authentication (MFA) also known as (also known as 2FA) where ever possible which locks down access to critical process functions, force username/password logins, combinations, Multi-factor authentication (MFA) also known as (also known as 2FA) where ever possible and etc. 

5. Device Hardening – Changing the default configuration of an embedded device out-of-the-box can make it more secure. The default security settings of PLCs, PACs, routers, switches, firewalls and other embedded devices will differ based on class and type, which subsequently changes the amount of work required to harden a particular device. But remember, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

6. Staff Education - Last but not least it’s important to talk to staff about keeping clean machine, the organization should have clear rules for what employees can install and keep on their work computers.  Make sure they understand and abide by these rules. Following good password practices is important a strong password is a phrase that is at least 12 characters long. Employees should be encouraged to keep an eye out and say something if they notice strange happenings on their computer.  


Educating Employees at least once a year is important
Training employees is a critical element of security. They need to understand the value of protecting customer and colleague information and their role in keeping it safe. They also need a basic grounding in other risks and how to make good judgments online.

Most importantly, they need to know the policies and practices you expect them to follow in the workplace regarding Internet safety.


-End

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vSphere 6.0 vCenter Windows 2012 R2 with SQL Server Install Guide

Tuesday, September 29, 2015 - Posted by Keith A. Smith, in VMware, Microsoft

VMware vSphere 6.0 has brought a simplified deployment model where the dependency on Microsoft SQL server has been reduced. You now have the option of using the built-in vPostgre SQL provided by VMware, vPostgres on windows is limited to 20 hosts and 200 virtual machines.

vCenter System requirements


Supported Windows Operation System for vCenter 6.0 Installation:

  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 SP2 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2012 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 64-bit

Supported Databases for vCenter 6.0 Installation:

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 SP1
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2014
  • Oracle 11g R2 11.2.0.4
  • Oracle 12c

1. Make sure that you using static IP for your VM and you create forward and reverse DNS records on your DNS server. Also make sure that the machine is part of Windows domain.

2. Create an account in your Active Directory, this will be used on the SQL server for the vCenter database

3. Now you need to create a blank SQL database on an SQL server.

4. Once your blank database is created, you need to add the account you created in your Active Directory. Make sure to give it sysadmin for the server role.


Before you start the installer make sure your Windows Server VM is fully patched, otherwise you might get a prompt to patch the server. The two patches that are needed are below



5. During the vCenter installation process you might get a prompt asking to give the administrator’s account the right to Log On as a service on the server that run vCenter.  You need to grant the domain account you created earlier the right to Log On as a service.

The steps:

  • Get to the Administrative Tools, and then double-click Local Security Policy.
  • In the console tree, double-click Local Policies, and then click User Rights Assignment.
  • In the details pane, double-click Log on as a service.


  • Click Add User or Group, and then add the domain account you created to the list of accounts that possess the Log on as a service right.


6. Important - The SQL server native client is necessary to create the system DSN. To download the SQL Server Native Client, click on the link below

This ODBC Driver for SQL Server supports x86 and x64 connections to SQL Azure Database, SQL Server 2012, SQL Server 2008 R2, SQL Server 2008, and SQL Server 2005.


http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=36434



7. Now that the SQL Server Native Client is installed, create system DSN through ODBC data source administrator (64-bit).





Proceed through the wizard




8. Once you have fill out all the SQL server information, make sure you test the data source




If you everything is setup correctly then you should see this




9. Mount the vCenter server ISO and double click the autorun.exe


10. Proceed through the vCenter install




11. Once you get to the database settings, you will need to choose use an external database. If you DSN is blank then click the refresh button and it should appear




Continue the setup wizard and leave the default values… You should see the setup complete screen.  At this point you can open up a browser and visit the vCenter interface which uses adobe flash.


-End

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vCenter 6.0 interface sucks

Thursday, September 10, 2015 - Posted by Keith A. Smith, in VMware, Journal of thoughts

As mentioned here http://bit.ly/1UrCpqN, I finally made the move back to vSphere and decided to go with version 6. There has been chatter over the past few years that, the release of a great new web client was coming. Well, it finally came and honestly, they would have been better off sticking with the fat client. Why..? You may ask. Because the interface is Flash! Yes, the same Flash that should have been deprecated by now, the same Flash that has more Zero-day vulnerabilities than a tennis net has holes. I don't understand why any company would develop an interface in Flash or Java at this point. I can here some people at VMware saying if we were to develop the vSphere 6 web client in HTML5 it would take more time. I think most if not all customers would say ok take the time, because HTML5 is the best way to go point blank!


I will say this, the vCenter doesn't totally suck


Positive:

1) New platform architecture 

2) Upgrade process is supposed to be a lot easier



Negatives:

1) Uses Flash — vulnerabilities, vulnerabilities, usability is terrible.

2) Uses Java — A catastrophe, Issues with every Java upgrade that are compatibility related,"security enhancements", vulnerabilities

3) Uses browsers & plugins — impacted by browser releases or changes, versions, vulnerabilities


I think that VMware needs to be more transparent about what they are doing with the replacement of this terrible Flash interface. I also think that they need to keep the TAM's informed so they can keep customers apprised of the progress.


-End

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